Want to work in marketing? No marketing degree required

on under Inbound Marketing.

So you finally graduate from college. But then you decide that your major just wasn't really your true calling. Maybe you're stuck on a career path that isn't going in the direction you want it to. And you've decided you want to work in the booming business of marketing! Don't worry, you can still get into the marketing world even if you don't have a degree in it. Here are a few majors that give you all the training you need, just without that "marketing" title.

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Communications/Journalism

One of the most easily translatable areas of study is anything under the umbrella of communications. As long as you're able to communicate properly, you'll be golden in marketing. Com students are taught public speaking and trained to produce excellent content. Depending on what area of marketing you're working in, this could be exactly what your potential employer is looking for.

If you're trained as a journalist, you've learned to wear many hats. In the age of modern technology, this doesn't only mean you can write a column for a newspaper. Journalists are tasked with creating content through interviews and extensive research. Once a piece is complete, they'll viciously self promote it through all kinds of social networks.

 

Management

Now we're going to use a bit of reverse psychology. The benefit of working in marketing and having a degree in business management is that you know what your client is looking for since you've experienced what they're going through. Management students learn how to create their own businesses and many different aspects of entrepreneurship.

These people know what businesses are looking for when it comes to their marketing strategy. They're great leaders and work well with others. They may be the type of person that you want as the head of the marketing team.

 

Economics

Econ majors tend to be a bit more money-minded than others. Which is great, from a client's point of view. They study trends in business and analyze data and costs. This type of person can look at a marketing strategy with a big picture view.

Someone with a thorough knowledge of economics might be a good person to have on a team when you're first developing a business plan. They're able to look ahead in ways that others can't. While they're not taught to think creatively as others, they see through a lense of logic that's always helpful when planning the future.

 

It's never too late to jump into a new career path. The skills that you have might be more adaptable to another job than you think. If you're trained in communicating well and have great leadership skills, a switch to marketing may be the right move for you.

 

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  • I completely agree that you don't need a marketing degree to get into marketing, but if we're talking about someone who is changing careers, do you think it's a better use of time and resources to get a second degree (as mentioned above) or to get an entry-level position in marketing (or internship)? Which will be more valuable in the long-term?